robocop2014

For those who were waiting for home video to watch the remake of RoboCop, your time has come! It, the complete series of Breaking Bad and new 4K masters of the classic Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns are the most attention-getting of this week’s new releases.

New:

  • Breaking Bad: The Complete Series Falling Skies: The Complete Third Season, True Blood: The Complete Sixth Season: So for those who didn’t buy them as they were released, there’s a huge Breaking Bad package for gift-giving purposes, while those who still fancy those New Orleans vampires can stay up to date before the premiere of the final season.
  • Lone Survivor: This Mark Wahlberg film was a surprise hit earlier this year, partly because of the cast, partly because it was pro-military in a way that audiences found palatable. The film itself is… there.
  • RoboCop: I’m curious to catch up with this one myself because it never looked very good to me, but as a fan of the original, I’m curious to see how it plays out (all evidence suggests not well).
  • Son of God: Another one of this year’s surprise hits, the film repackaged footage from a TV show and turned it into a feature film that was surprisingly successful. This has proven there’s an audience for religious themed pictures, but not enough to support a blockbuster.

Classics:

  • Alexander (The Ultimate Cut), The Outsiders (The Complete Novel Edition), The Nutty Professor: 50th Anniversary: Is this the fourth cut of Oliver Stone’s Alexander? Maybe by the sixth one he’ll get it right. That Nutty Professor set looks amazing, though.
  • The Birdcage, The Man with No Name Trilogy: I have the original release Blu-rays of the Man with No Name Trilogy, so color me surprised I’m tempted to get dipped yet again for this new version.
  • The Break-Up, You, Me and Dupree: For those who loved Captain America: The Winter Soldier, here’s a chance to revisit the Russo Brothers’ work before they went to Marvel.  
  • Ravenous: Scream Factory’s transfer of the film is said to be very disappointing, but Ravenous, which was abandoned by its studio upon release only to gain a small but passionate cult following in the interim, is a film worthy of rediscovery as the film uses cannibalism as an interesting metaphor for both the lust for power and for gay panic.

What are you picking up this week?