Tremors

Elementary is inching towards its midseason finale, but if you didn’t know any better you’d think “Tremors” was it. It’s a well-done cinematic episode that weaves in and out of a courtroom following a traumatic event. Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller) and Watson (Lucy Liu) are at a pivotal point in their careers that will alter their association with the NYPD for the worse.

The Players:

  • Director: Aaron Lipstadt
  • Writer: Liz Friedman
  • Cast: Jonny Lee Miller, Lucy Liu, Aidan Quinn, Jon Michael Hill, Elizabeth Marvel, Frankie Faison

Episode Title: “Tremors”

We follow Sherlock and Watson as they’re both put on the stand for events leading up to the injury of a police officer. It’s an unfortunate event that may have been prevented if their antagonizing didn’t push a suspect too far. They recount the murder that brought them to this point, which makes them and the NYPD evaluate whether or not their services are really needed.

The Good:

  • On The Stand: Earlier, I mentioned this episode felt cinematic compared to most in the series. A large part of that has to do with the courtroom setting that our main characters are in for half of the time. We leap back and forth between the court to the events that brought them there. By doing so, it lets the audience examine and quietly evaluate how Sherlock and Watson go about their business as consulting detectives. At one point the lawyer asks whether or not Sherlock thinks he breaks some laws while solving a case, he replies that he’s doing what’s necessary to get it solved. The balance of the episode works a lot better with the courtroom setting, giving it an outline as to how the rest of the story will be plotted out. It was some solid editing and directorial work.
  • Detective Bell: It’s revealed halfway through the episode that the officer who got shot was Detective Bell. This was brought on due to Sherlock’s antagonizing ways towards a suspects he faces for a case. Some people don’t easily forgive and forget, which is just what happens when Detective Bell asks Sherlock not to visit him in the hospital anymore. Sure he convinced the commissioner of the NYPD to let Sherlock and Watson continue as consultants, but that comes at a price. Throughout the first half of the season there’s been a lot of angst between the NYPD and Sherlock, but Bell and Gregson have always had their backs. Now they’re starting to lose the only allies they have on the force. If they extinguish the fire of trust from Captain Gregson, then what chance do they have out there? It’s a particularly sticky predicament they’ve gotten themselves into, and the final conversation between Bell and Sherlock was bound to happen eventually.
  • A Different Light: We’re enjoy following Sherlock and Watson’s cases, but we never think about the way they conduct themselves throughout their investigations. He’s a rather boorish individual who stops at nothing to solve a case. He was bound to make a few enemies along the way, and unfortunately Detective Bell got in the crosshairs of an awful situation. They’ve been criticized for a while now, and we may get to the point where Sherlock or Watson could really suffer for their diligent work.

The So-So:

  • Commissioner: For a while, Captain Gregson has been letting Sherlock and Watson have their way solving a number of investigations. Now that they’re under fire for the way they’ve conduct their work, wouldn’t the commissioner be less forgiving? There has to be a thought in the back of his head thinking of the hell the NYPD would catch if these two were ever physically injured or worse. I’m surprised they wrote him as such a sympathetic character, giving Detective Bell the final say-so on whether or not the two should continue working. Either way, the decision puts more drama and pressure on the two as they realize they’re not welcome in this world.

The Bad:

  • Anything To Say Watson?: Something that boggled my mind was what little Watson had to say against Sherlock. She was dragged along with him into this lawsuit as they both faced the possibility of termination. At this point she’s almost equally as good as Sherlock in the detective business, even though he claims she still has a lot to learn under his guidance. The fact that she didn’t put up too much of a fight for being put on the stand is out of character for such an opinionated woman. Watson would more than likely be re-evaluating whether or not consulting detective work with Sherlock is still the life path that she should continue on. Maybe they’ll sprinkle that into the next episode. We’ll just have to wait and see.

Overall:

“Tremors” pulls the final pieces together for what could be an explosive second half of the season. Sherlock and Watson are moving closer to the edge as their lives are put in a heightened amount of danger. This just makes me even more excited to see how they carry on for next week’s midseason finale.

Rating: 9/10

Elementary airs on Thursdays at 10 p.m. on CBS.

What did you think of the episode?