broken-city-8

There are a number of more new releases to home video today than in the last couple weeks, which is exciting, but most are wash outs from earlier this year and from last year. There are some great catalog titles, which is nice. Check it out…

New:

  • Broken City -  This January title was dead on arrival, but with a great cast (Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe and Catherine Zeta-Jones),  it should be a cable perennial in about six months.
  • The Guilt Trip – In what can best be described as painless, Seth Rogen teams up with Barbra Streisand for this comedy about a mother and son road trip that leads to understanding and growth. It’s about ninety minutes long, and is something that will be easy to sit through when hanging with parents.
  • Not Fade Away – David Chase follows up The Sopranos with this feature film that was mostly ignored at the end of the year. The story of a young boy who wants a hot girl (Bella Heathcote) in the late 60’s definitely has a killer soundtrack, and deserves to be seen.
  • Silver Linings Playbook Jennifer Lawrence took home the best actress Oscar for her work in this romantic comedy about two people with mental health issues that find love. It’s cute, and thankfully didn’t win best picture.
  • Texas Chainsaw – 3D – The latest follow up to Tobe Hooper’s revered masterpiece is supposedly better than the last couple of remakes/sequels/prequels/ rip-offs. So that’s something.

Classics

  • Cloak and Dagger, Night of the Scarecrow, The Unbelievable Truth – The latest from Olive offers a great Fritz Lang war movie (that was one of the film that David and Jerry Zucker and Jim Abrahams drew on to make Top Secret!), a horror film from the 90’s, and one of Hal Hartley’s best films. Nice.
  • Funny Girl – It’s Barbra on Blu-ray week. This was the picture that won Streisand her Oscar, and is a charming movie with Streisand playing comedy legend Fanny Brice.
  • The Notebook: Ultimate Collector’s Edition Gift Set – Sure, why not.
  • Strictly Ballroom – As we wait for Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby, it’s good to get a refresher course on why he was such a hot property coming to America. Like a lot of first films, this is rough around the edges, but like a lot of first films it could be his best.
  • The Vampire Lovers  – In the late 60’s, Hammer saw the ratings system making it harder to deliver the appropriate scares and excitement to horror audiences, so they started adding nudity. And it’s why many men grew to appreciate Ingrid Pitt, the star of this film.

What are you picking up this week?