Ever since Paranormal Activity took a film with a minuscule budget and made hundreds of millions of dollars with a studio release and a ton of online marketing, everyone has been is hoping to repeat the process. Obviously, this wasn’t the first time this was done, remember Blair Witch, Hostel? But it was one of the first times that the internet buzz took the film into $100 million territory.

There’s no doubt that horror is one of the best genre’s for small budgets, it doesn’t take special effects or CGI to scare an audience – in fact often times it’s better without all the extra fluff. And on that note, we have the next highly rated, soon to be marketed, low-budget horror film starting to get some action…

The North-American DVD, VOD and Broadcast rights to Four Boxes, a thriller described as ‘“Rear Window on the Internet” and starring Justin Kirk (who is pretty well-known, which separates this film slightly from some of the other low-budget films mentioned), has been acquired by E1 Entertainment. The film, which was written, produced and directed by Minneapolis film-making husband-and-wife team Wyatt McDill and Megan Huber, had its World Premiere at SXSW in 2009 and it’s headed to this year’s Cannes Market. Range Life Entertainment is tentatively slated to tour the film theatrically in the Fall to coincide with a Halloween DVD release in North America.

In the film, Trevor Grainger (played by Justin Kirk), Amber Croft (played by Terryn Westbrook, “Inland Empire”) and Rob Rankrus (Sam Rosen – “Revolutionary Road,” “The Oranges”) run Go-Time Liquidators – an ambulance-chasing eBay auction business. In a dead man’s destroyed suburban house they start watching a bookmarked surveillance-cam website showing sinister footage from an actual website: fourboxes.tv. The film has been variously described by critics and programmers as “The Blair Witch Project’ meets YouTube,” and “The ‘sex, lies and videotape’ of our time.”

The writer, director, and producer team of the film had the following to say about Four Boxes…

“This is a brand new kind of film – a game-changing film that hints at the artistic and infrastructural collapse between film storytelling and internet storytelling,” says McDill. “This story wasn’t possible before the internet warped our sense of reality,” says Huber. “In a film, you know what’s real – on the web, you don’t. The way people will experience ‘Four Boxes’ begins on the website and doesn’t end until long after they have left the theater. This is the first film of its kind – the killer app of digital filmmaking in the internet age.”

Check out the trailer…

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This will be the next big horror/thriller hit?