We have some very sad news this morning, Paul Newman, the legendary actor has died of cancer at his home in Westport, Connecticut. He was 83. He died Friday, according to spokeswoman Marni Tomljanovic.

Newman starred in such classic films as, “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” “Exodus,” “The Hustler,” “Cool Hand Luke,” “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “The Sting” and “The Verdict.” He won an Oscar in 1986 for “The Color of Money,” a sequel to “The Hustler.” He later received two more Oscar nominations. Among his other awards was the Motion Picture Academy’s Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

“Paul took advantage of what life offered him, and while personally reluctant to acknowledge that he was doing anything special, he forever changed the lives of many with his generosity, humor, and humanness,” said Robert Forrester, vice chairman of the actor’s Newman’s Own Foundation. “His legacy lives on in the charities he supported and the Hole in the Wall Camps, for which he cared so much.

He was often willing to make fun of himself. Early in his career he was mistaken for fellow Method actor Marlon Brando; Newman obligingly signed autographs, “Best wishes, Marlon Brando.”

He stumped for liberal causes, including Eugene McCarthy’s 1968 presidential candidacy, and earned a spot on Richard Nixon’s enemies list — “the highest single honor I’ve ever received,” he said.

In 1982, Newman and his friend A.E. Hotchner founded Newman’s Own, a food company that produced food ranging from pasta sauces to salad dressing to chocolate chip cookies.

“The embarrassing thing is that the salad dressing is outgrossing my films,” Newman once wryly noted.

To date, the company — which donates all profits to charities such as Newman’s Hole in the Wall camps — has given away more than $200 million. Newman established the camp to benefit gravely ill children.

“He saw the camps as places where kids could escape the fear, pain and isolation of their conditions, kick back and raise a little hell,” Forrester said.

Today, there are 11 Hole in the Wall camps around the world, with additional programs in Africa and Vietnam. Some 135,000 children have attended the camps — free of charge.

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